Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

Rodent control programmes can integrate Echinococcus multilocularis surveillance by facilitating parasite genotyping: the case of Arvicola terrestris voles screening in France

Abstract : The tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis is the causative agent of alveolar echinococcosis, the most serious parasitic disease for humans in Europe. In Europe, the E. multilocularis lifecycle is based on a prey–predator relationship between the red fox and small rodents. Over the last three decades, the surveillance of E. multilocularis infection in red foxes has led to the description of a wider distribution pattern across Europe. France constitutes the current European western border, but only the north-eastern half of the country is considered endemic. The red fox is the host mainly targeted in E. multilocularis surveillance programmes, but surveys targeting small rodents may be useful for obtaining molecular data, especially when the time-consuming trapping is already carried out in dedicated pest-control programmes. Here, we screened for parasitic lesions in the livers of 1238 Arvicola terrestris voles originating from the historical, but neglected focal area located in central France (Auvergne region) and from Hautes-Alpes, a recently identified endemic department in south-eastern France. This screening identified six voles infected with E. multilocularis in Hautes-Alpes and none in Puy-de-Dôme (Auvergne region) after molecular confirmation. The absence of infected rodents from Puy-de-Dôme can be mainly explained by the generally low prevalence reported in intermediate hosts. The infected Hautes-Alpes samples come all from the same trapping site situated at around 5 km from one of the three fox faecal samples with E. multilocularis DNA collected 15 years prior, thereby confirming the existence and persistence of the E. multilocularis lifecycle in the area. All the rodent E. multilocularis samples from Hautes-Alpes showed the same EmsB microsatellite marker profile. This profile has previously been described in Europe only in the Jura department (central eastern France), located at least 180 km further north. Successive migrations of infected foxes from the historical focal area, including from Jura, to Hautes-Alpes may explain the detection of the parasite in A. terrestris in Hautes-Alpes. Existing trapping efforts in areas where farmers trap A. terrestris for surveillance and pest control can be an effective complement to sampling foxes or fox faeces to obtain E. multilocularis molecular profiles.
Complete list of metadata

https://hal-anses.archives-ouvertes.fr/anses-03292784
Contributor : Sophie Marchal-Mauer Connect in order to contact the contributor
Submitted on : Tuesday, July 20, 2021 - 3:46:11 PM
Last modification on : Tuesday, October 12, 2021 - 2:48:21 PM

Licence


Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Identifiers

`

Citation

Gérald Umhang, Jean-Michel Demerson, Léo Legras, Jean-Marc Boucher, Carine Peytavin de Garam, et al.. Rodent control programmes can integrate Echinococcus multilocularis surveillance by facilitating parasite genotyping: the case of Arvicola terrestris voles screening in France. Parasitology Research, Springer Verlag (Germany), 2021, 120 (5), pp.1903-1908. ⟨10.1007/s00436-021-07126-7⟩. ⟨anses-03292784⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

44